Red Kimono portraits online

In the next few days the final four of the thirty Red Kimono portraits will be published on the website as well as on the facebook page and on twitter.

The accompanying booklets, are available for visitors to take, free of charge, in the Conway Hall Entrance on Red Lion Square, or by post if you send a request to: contactredkimono@gmail.com

Today’s portrait is of Milly:

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Red Kimono: Milly © Lis Fields 2015

Red Kimono booklet – version 4

Version 4 was produced in the UK for the Red Kimono In The Window installation at Conway Hall, London, 1st March – 31st August 2016, for visitors to take away, free of charge.

The contents are the same as version 1 – containing the English translations of the letters, memoirs and speech by evacuees from Fukushima and excerpts from the statements by ’50 complainants for the criminal prosecution of the Fukushima nuclear disaster’ in the e-book  titled: Fukushima Radiation: Will You Still Say No Crime Was Committed?More about the statements here.

The cover of version 4 now includes information about Osaka-based organisation  Thanks and Dream, The Great East Japan Earthquake & Nuclear Disaster Evacuee Association  of which Akiko Morimatsu (pictured on the back cover) is a key member.

Booklets are available in the Conway Hall Entrance on Red Lion Square, or by post if you send a request to: contactredkimono@gmail.com

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Red Kimono in the window @ Conway Hall

March 4th – May 31st 2016

The second exhibition of Red Kimono at Conway Hall in Holborn, London WC1, marks the 5th anniversary of the catastrophic accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

Eight of the thirty portraits, and a poster bearing explanatory text, are on display in the window which looks onto Theobalds Road , a busy road in central London.

Booklets containing stories, letters and statements by evacuees from Fukushima are available in the entrance area on Red Lion Square, for visitors to take, free of charge.

The eight portraits on display:

Prasanth

Alex

Shigeo

Yvonne

Xi Zhang

Dee

Michael

Steve

The explanatory text poster:

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Fukushima witness accounts, English translation in digital format

Fukushima Radiation: Will You Still Say No Crime Was Committed?

by 50 Complainants for Criminal Prosecution of the FUKUSHIMA Nuclear Disaster

Norma Field (Translator), Matthew Mizenko (Translator)

This booklet is a translation of statements by 50 citizens who were residing in Fukushima at the time of the triple disaster of March 11, 2011.
They range in age from 7 to 87, and they wrote these statements as part of the criminal complaint filed with the public prosecutor by the Fukushima Complainants for Criminal Prosecution of the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster. What, exactly, is a criminal complaint, and who is a “complainant”? In this case, the complaint is the formal legal procedure initiated by citizens in response to the failure of both prosecutors and police to investigate the criminal liability of Tepco and government agencies for their roles in the nuclear disaster. The group complaint, filed at the office of the public prosecutor, is a demand for investigation and indictment of the responsible parties.

Because this is a criminal and not a civil procedure, these citizens are “complainants” rather than “plaintiffs.”

True, some of the Complainants are also plaintiffs in the various civil cases generated by the Fukushima disaster, such as the “Give Us Back Our Livelihood, Give Us Back Our Community” Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Lawsuit; “Denounce Nuclear Power Generation: Redress for the Villagers of Iitate”; or “The Fukushima Collective Evacuation Trial for the Right to Education in a Safe Place.”

Although several Complainants in this booklet draw a connection between the failure of the state to pursue criminal liability and the difficulty of getting anything resembling adequate compensation from Tepco, it is important to keep in mind that as Complainants, they do not stand to gain anything individually even under the best-case scenario: if, after all the prosecutorial refusals, an indictment is brought, a trial held, and some parties found to be criminally responsible for the nuclear disaster.

Rather, the Complainants are driven by grief, anger, and incredulity. So much harm had been inflicted, with demonstrated negligence not only leading up to the disaster but in its aftermath, with dire consequences not only for themselves but flung far into the future. After all this, how could it be that no one was held responsible? How could it be that the police, let alone the prosecutors, had not conducted a thorough investigation? Did the rule of law not prevail in Japan? As victims bearing witness, they seek to exercise their responsibility to future generations, that the calamity not be repeated, that the harm be contained by all means possible.’

available from Amazon here. No need for a Kindle – readable via the Kindle app:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00XKIZRX4

M.K.’s photos from Fukushima – from before and after the 3.11 disaster

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M.K.’s son looking for a sign of spring in the garden – before the 3.11 disaster.

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M.K.’s son watching the Shinkansen (bullet train) – his favorite pastime.

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The carps they put up for their son (a Japanese tradition to pray for boys’ healthy growth) the year before the disaster. It turned out to be the only year they could do this.

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the flowers in the garden they used to have.

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more of the flowers in the garden they used to have.

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the white and pink peach trees they planted to commemorate their son’s birth.

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Their house before the 3.11 disaster with big trees.

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The trees were chopped down for the decontamination work (photo taken on 3rd January, 2015).

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The chopped up trees left abandoned (nowhere to go) in the corner (3 Jan., 2015).

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Fukushima’s famous one-thousand-year-old cherry tree called “Takizakura” (waterfall cherry tree).

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The 1000-year-old cherry tree had to witness the stupid human disaster.

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The dosimeter showing the radiation level (photo taken in their garden on 4th January, 2014).

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The empty lot shown here used to be her grandmother’s vegetable garden (6th May, 2015).

click here for M.K.’s ‘Journey’