Documenting the Fukushima aftermath

Documenting the Fukushima aftermath

Documenting the Fukushima aftermath
— Read on


Fleeing from Fukushima: a nuclear evacuation reality check

Beyond Nuclear International

By Dr. Ian Fairlie

(The following is an excerpt from a longer article on the subject of evacuations after severe nuclear accidents. While this section focuses on Fukushima, there are lessons here for all nuclear sites and the likely failure of “on paper” evacuation plans.)

If another severe nuclear accident, such as Windscale (in 1957), Chernobyl (1986) or Fukushima (2011) were to occur, then the most important response, in terms of preventing future cancer epidemics, is evacuation. The other main responses are shelter and stable iodine prophylaxis. Adverse health effects would primarily depend on wind direction and on the nature of the accident.  This article looks primarily at the Fukushima evacuation and its after-effects.

When the Fukushima-Daiichi, Japan nuclear disaster began on March 11, 2011, evacuations were not immediate and some were hampered by the destructive after-effects of the Tsunami and earthquake that precipitated the nuclear crisis.

Once people were evacuated…

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“Save the Town”: Insolvable Dilemmas of Fukushima’s “Return Policy” – interview with Mayor of Namie, Fukushima

Namie Mayor Baba Tamotsu interviewed by Katsuya Hirano with Yoshihiro Amaya and Yoh Kawano at Namie town hall, July 4th, 2017. Introduction by Katsuya Hirano, Transcription and translation by Akiko Anson Baba Tamotsu. Photo by Yoh Kawano Introduction The town of Namie is the largest in both area and population among eight towns and villages within Futaba Country in Fukushima […]

via “Save the Town”: Insolvable Dilemmas of Fukushima’s “Return Policy” — Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

Fukushima Disaster’s Victims

Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

I decided to translate this particular article because this article for a change talks about the Fukushima disaster victims and in details how their everyday lives have been affected.
In most of the Fukushima related articles from websites and mainstream media, the writers usually focus on the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and its technical failures, about its continuous leaking into the Pacific ocean etc. but somehow they almost always forget to talk about the plight of the victims, the victims who are at the forefront of this tragedy.

August 12, 2016

Article written by Evelyne Genoulaz, from a lecture given by Kurumi Sugita,

translated by Dun Renard.

Source : Fukushima Blog de Pierre Fetet

March 11, 2016, Kurumi Sugita, social anthropologist researcher and founding president of the association “Our Far Neighbors 3.11”, gave a lecture entitled “Fukushima disaster’s lives” in the Nature and Environment House (MNEI) in Grenoble…

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Red Kimono portraits online

In the next few days the final four of the thirty Red Kimono portraits will be published on the website as well as on the facebook page and on twitter.

The accompanying booklets, are available for visitors to take, free of charge, in the Conway Hall Entrance on Red Lion Square, or by post if you send a request to:

Today’s portrait is of Milly:


Red Kimono: Milly © Lis Fields 2015